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Your Adobo, Your Story

In every city of any country a Filipino resides in, home is where the Adobo is. More than a staple dish, Adobo is a way of cooking meat with versatile ingredients and tasty flavors you can tweak to your liking. The amazing fusion of vinegar, soy sauce, bay leaves, garlic, and black peppercorn in every Adobo recipe is a winning formula that always reminds you of home. 
Now, cooking Adobo doesn’t have to be so complicated, thanks to your Instant Pot multi cooker.  
Successfully cut down cooking time to minutes and enjoy fall-off-the-bone meat with the flavors you love in Adobo all in one pot. Read on to discover the origins of our Filipino Adobo and Adobo dishes that share diverse and delicious stories!

Adobo Origins 

Our Filipino Adobo has existed since pre-Hispanic times and reflects different cultural influences. Malay voyagers first introduced the use of vinegar and salt to early Filipinos as food preservatives in warm climates, which helped enhance flavors and tenderize meat.
When Chinese traders arrived, they brought with them a number of ingredients that were quickly adapted by the locals. Soy sauce slowly replaced the use of salt and became a staple ingredient in cooking Adobo, giving its dark color. 
Later on, Spanish friar Pedro de San Buenaventura set foot on our land. He discovered similarities in our cooking methods with Spanish and Mexican dishes called adobo, which means “marinade” or “pickling sauce”. With the original name of our vinegar-braised dish lost in history, he then coined the term adobo de los naturales or “adobo of the natives” in his dictionary.

Adobo Dishes With Your Instant Pot

Today, the name Adobo has remained and every Filipino household has their own take on it. Explore these variations that add a twist to the classic flavors you love in Adobo.
Adobong Manok (Chicken Adobo)
The “standard” version served across the country has vinegar and soy sauce at its heart. The signature dish has a dark color and salty flavor, which is best eaten once all the flavors have mixed, reabsorbed and intensified. Follow our super tasty and easy recipe here: Chicken Adobo
Adobong Dilaw (Yellow Adobo)
Similar to the standard version, this Adobo from Batangas and Cavite uses turmeric instead of soy sauce. The key ingredient adds a distinct peppery flavor and yellow hue to the chicken braised in vinegar and garlic. Equally popular in Visayas and Mindanao areas, taste the wonders of this dish in minutes! Try it here: Adobong Dilaw
Adobong Pusit (Squid Adobo)
Where seafood is plentiful and meat is scarce, Mindoro’s Adobo has squid for protein and comes out with black sauce from pouring squid ink into vinegar and soy sauce. See our fantastic recipe here: Adobong Pusit
Adobo sa Atsuete or Adobong Pula (Red Adobo)
With atsuete or annatto powder and ginger, this Adobo by Illongos turns your mixture of garlic, vinegar and soy sauce into a bright red. Give this distinct flavor and aroma a try for your lunch! Head over to the recipe here: Adobong Pula
Adobong Hipon sa Gata (Shrimp Adobo in Coconut Milk)
Popular in Southern Luzon, Bicolanos take their Adobo to the next level with coconut milk. To give it an additional kick, they use green finger chili peppers instead of black peppercorns. Recreate this unique taste of Zamboanga in the comfort of your home with this amazing recipe here: Adobong Hipon sa Gata
The Adobo recipes don’t stop here! There are countless delicious versions from all over the country. Some of our other favorite variations are Adobo Flakes, where leftover meat is shredded and fried until it’s brown and crisp, and Pineapple Pork Adobo, where pineapple chunks add a sweet and refreshing flavor. All these recipes can also be paired with pan de sal, siopao and puto or used as yummy toppings on pizza and spaghetti. 
Whether you recreate a traditional Adobo recipe or make your own version, do it best with Instant Pot’s quick and easy, one pot cooking. 

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